Author Archives: TetonTrekker

About TetonTrekker

Mom, wife, computer geek, web designer, musician, ski bum, photographer, bicyclist, camper, glamper, fishing woman, treasure hunter, bookkeeper, office wizard, trekking through life in Jackson Hole

Milk the Cow Theory

Wednesday, February 21st, 2018

Valued Advice from an Old Cowhand

Always take a good look at what you’re about to eat. It’s not so important to know what it is, but it’s critical to know what it was.When I was 16  my family moved from Southern California to Bishop, a small town 40 miles south of Mammoth Mountain. It was there that I first learned to ski and love the mountain life. Just after graduation met a cowboy and I traded in my city slick’n lifestyle for good. We traveled the western states with everything we owned in the back of an old 70’s ford station wagon complete with the classic faux wood stripe. As short lived as my life in that world was, I learned a lot about ranch life, it was quite the education. Since then I never looked at a piece of beef, or a gallon of milk the same again.

Ranch jobs were generally in the middle of nowhere and included housing, beef, fresh rocky mountain oysters, and sometimes fresh milk. The women stayed home, cared for the house, the cooking, the dogs, and the men. Sometimes we got paid $20 a day to work the ground crew during brandings. And if we were lucky, housing was close enough together for us “Women Folk” to visit over a pot of coffee and a game of Gin Rummy, after the chores were done of course. My particular Cowboy, or as he like to be called “Buckaroo”, went through jobs (and wives) like scours through a calf, I got to sample a variety of ranches in a short amount of time. I could write a blog on the ranch in Lida, Nevada alone, but that’s another story.

One of the most valuable pieces of advice I was handed is one I use to this day. In 1980 we started a job on a JR Simplot feed lot in Mountain Home, Idaho. The housing was one of the better houses we lived in, except the fact that it was unfurnished. Remember I told you every thing we owned fit in the back of a station wagon. COW BOSS: In charge of the cattle operation on a ranch. They choose where the cowboys will ride and hire and fire cowboys. Answer to the general manager.After our first day on the ranch we were invited to dinner at the Cow Bosses house. He was a rugged old cowboy, like you might see on a painting of the old west. I was about 120 lbs soaking wet and had that city girl look, I felt small, out of place, and painfully shy. The Cow Boss’s wife was in the kitchen cooking like a pro, I was in the living room trying not to say something stupid. After a bit he asked me, in his natural bellowing voice, “Do you know how to mike a cow?”. Afraid of what he may say when he heard my answer, I very meekly said “no”. He replied in a very authoritative tone “Well don’t learn! Or you will be out there early every morning milking the cows.”.

“Milk the Cow Theory” was born.

I never learned how to mend fence either, spouting off my “Milk the Cow” theory as a reason not to help. “Nope, I don’t want to learn to milk that cow”. As a matter of fact, I can’t even be fooled into mending fence. (You know who you are 🙂 )

For pricing and more photos by TetonTrekker go to my page at DeviantArt

Herbie vs. Cousin It

Monday, January 1st, 2018

I had to keep Cousin it locked away in a closet for Halloween until he made an appearance with the Jackson Hole Community Band at their annual Concert for the Kids.

Where’s Cousin It?

Pintrest is a fun place to find new ideas. While surfing one day I found easy instructions for making a Cousin It Halloween prop. All you need is:

  • A tomato cage
  • Plastic Wrap (I added this to keep skirt in place)
  • 2 or 3 Dollar Store Hula Skirts
  • A wire tie
  • Hat
  • Dollar Store child’s sunglasses


  1. Tun the tomato cage upside down and bend down the stakes.
  2. Wrap the cage in plastic wrap.
  3. Wrap the hula skirts around the cage. If the cage is taller than the skirt is long start low and use wire ties to hold in place.
    • Use enough skirts to cover with a full head of ‘hair’. They are only a buck, don’t be stingy.
  4. Use wire tie to secure ends to top.
  5. Place hat on top.
  6. Place glasses appropriately, it can be stuck through the plastic wrap or taped to it.

That’s It! Well, almost….
Keep the cuz out of your cat’s reach. I proudly put my new decoration on the kitchen table and went to get my camera, I came back to a hula mess on the kitchen floor. Herbie could not resist for a minute, he had cousin it on the floor in pieces and was still torturing his prey.

Herbie killed Cousin It!

Hanging from a ceiling hook did the trick.